Goals Aspirations Essay College

I just want to start off by saying that I am truly blessed to be able to have the opportunity that so many don’t have: getting an education. I dreamed I would always be able to learn to be able to do a little of everything no matter what it was: either it was learning culinary, mechanics, science, mathematics, history, etc. I’ve just wanted to be that one person who knows a little of everything; no matter what the skill was I could do it. It may sound impossible but “nothings impossible.” As I enter the college life, this is where I will be determining my dream and where I truly will belong for the rest of my life it may take a while but that’s what college is for to really test the waters and become comfortable with the one that occupation that really fits me well. I think what I really want to achieve in college is to be a role model; to be the role model that I want to be responsible by being able to balance my school, work, and social life, but most importantly I want to be able to make my family proud and support them like they did for me. I think my biggest dream was to become someone who can aspire and motivate people with their creativity or to just be a role model – hopefully that this experience in college will truly help me accomplish that.

I know that knowledge is key to pretty much everything we have to know – practically every and anything about whatever occupation we want to have. But what’s wrong with using our creative side – isn’t it fun too just maybe once show up to class and have to draw for an assignment but no one says it has to be perfect no one expects you to be Picasso. We are being required to draw and use our creative side express our artistic side whether it be through words, drawing just to be able to just your true potential with creativity. In my experience of high school I had an amazing literature teacher who would sometimes just be fun and creative and just have us draw for one of our journals but it wasn’t stupid it was creative. Being creative is one of my biggest passions in life. I hope that I can truly show people there is nothing wrong with being creative. Responsible the one thing some people are afraid to be. When you hear the words independent it describes everything about being responsible. It’s when you start to do things on your own – a simple definition. In depth you have your own apartment maybe, pay your own car, bills, and you have a stable good paying job.

It shows true responsibility when you can balance your school, work, and social life because you’ve shown how mature and independent you can be – there is nothing more accomplishing to prove that you pushed yourself through all those nights of tears and sweat to finish that assignment. High School was a sort of breaking point for me with AP literature to give me a taste of the college life – all the nights I stood up to complete my papers. I can tell you this it was honestly worth it even though it stressed me out as I stared hours at a blank page at how to start my paper but then once you get going it all just flows out. One thing I know is that all that dedication of my time and effort will help me to be coming successful in my future. I wouldn’t be able to have done it without the support of my family and friends.

So my goal in college is to graduate and figure out what I want to be. When I do graduate I want to be able to support and be there for everyone who did the same for me. Most of all I want to spoil my parents and spoil and treasure then like they did to me and my siblings. I honestly couldn’t have done it without their words of wisdom, kindness and experiences that showed me this opportunity I have to take advantage of so on behalf of my parents, family and friends my journey to success is my gift to you and may I make you prouder than you are when you saw me with my first cap and gown.

The college admissions essay is a milestone for many high school students. And though people generally tend to enjoy writing about themselves, the admissions essay is usually viewed a little differently. Its often surrounded by a lot of anxiety and uncertainty as it relates to being accepted to a particular college or university-which can definitely be justified.

So what is the purpose of the admissions essay?

In many cases, the main idea of the admissions essay is for students demonstrate to the admissions department or review committee that they are a good match for the school and worthy of being admitted (based on the many things that they have to offer).

The second major aim of the college admissions essay doesn't have much to do with 'selling' or 'proving' anything-it simply involves letting the school know who you are and what makes you unique and different from everyone else. This can be considered the 'lighter side' of the admissions essay that is sometimes forgotten. Overall, the main goal or purpose of the admissions essay can be explained with three main objectives.

The Three Main Objectives

Though descriptions given about admissions essays may vary from school to school, in a nutshell the basic objectives of an admissions essay are as follows;

  1. To provide the review committee with information that can't be found elsewhere on the student's application
  2. To identify what makes them special, unique, and sets them apart from others (this may also include specific hobbies and interest)
  3. To share the student's life goals and aspirations, to get a better idea of what they would like to achieve and how the particular college or university can help them achieve that

These goals and objectives are generally made quite clear in the various questions asked within most college applications. Along with knowing the main goals of the essay, it may also help to simplify it into five general sections

Five Parts to the Admissions Essay

1. Who are you?

This section may likely come at the beginning of your essay in the introduction or early on in the writing; it provides the reader with some basic background information on you. What you supply should be useful and appropriate, and just enough to provide the reviewer with a context for your essay. For example, if you plan to talk about your struggle with learning English as a second language, you should obviously first explain to the reader what your first language is, where you are from, how long you've been living where you are and so on.

2. What major things have impacted your life?

College questions will usually ask about a specific influence or impact from your life experience. In helping to paint a picture of who you are its very important to know what helped to make you the person you are today. Many things influence our development and major life choices, they generally include; environment, close relationships, social status/class, and special happenings or events.

3. Why are you applying here? Why this program?

These questions may appear a little blunt, but essentially the admissions committee does want to know, why them? why here? Even though many students may just select schools for very simple or superficial reasons, reviewers generally don't want to hear that you've chosen their school because your best friend is also applying or because its close to home. They obviously require more thought-out, planned, and in-depth responses. So instead of making up an answer (which will likely be pretty transparent) take the opportunity to actual investigate the school you are applying to-it may turn out that its not the best school for you! And in doing so you can provide real, genuine answers in your essay to demonstrate that you've actually done your homework and you know what the school can offer you and why it would be a good choice for you at this time.

4. What are your plans for the future?

In this section students can focus on specific educational plans as well as general life goals. In many ways this section is connected to the previous question as schools are usually concerned as to how their school or program in particular will work into a student's long term life goals and aspirations. Though non-educational goals may be included, such as raising a family, moving to another country, or other than that, they should be restricted to appropriate topics that are in some way connected to educational and career-related objectives. This may not always be the case, but generally speaking it's best to keep the tone of the essay friendly and professional without being too personal, and career and education aims are easy ways of achieving that.

5. Would you like to explain anything specific about your record?

This last section may actually be more suited for the admission essay objectives list. Because in many cases one of the goals of the essay is to address unclear or ambiguous concerns not apparent in the application. So for example, if there is a gap in education (for instance with transfer students) or a poor academic report, low test scores, or something of this nature, the admissions essay is a chance to clarify and explain these issues. Though a specific question may not be asked regarding this, if there is a real pressing concern that you'd like to explain, there should be a way to work it into your essay one way or the other (or simply add an additional note or section to the essay).

Sample essay questions

In addition to the general objectives mentioned earlier, as well as the above section guidelines, some students may also benefit from practice essay questions. Practice is great for many things and with the admissions essay it can lessen some of the stress and anxiety connected to applying for and being admitted into college.

Below are a few sample questions/request;

  1. Provide one example of how your socioeconomic background influenced your decision to apply to this college.
  2. How will your attending this school help you achieve your educational goals?
  3. In what ways do you think that you will contribute to our institution?

You may have noticed that in some way the above questions touch on issues covered in the main objectives (though they may be presented slightly differently and demand concrete examples or a brief elaboration on some points). With that being said, in general, if you are able to fulfill the three main admissions essay objectives clearly and precisely in your writing, you should be able to easily address most questions posed in any college admissions application.

Some tips on getting your answers right

Its worth mentioning that even if you've already explored some of the issues mentioned in an essay question or prepared some portion of your essay ahead of time, its important to write a unique answer for each application. This will help to ensure that you directly and accurately answer the question that was requested of you.

So for example, a few generic paragraphs describing your educational goals is not sufficient to answer question number #2 above; because you must also research what the school offers and incorporate specific attributes of the school into your essay to properly answer this question (by stating how the school can help you attain your educational goals).

In some cases students do actually get so involved in their writing that they may forget to answer the question! So be mindful of that when preparing answers; constantly check the question to make sure you are on track and strive to create a unique and personalized essay for each school. Generic essays usually appear as so and may be looked at unfavorably by your admissions reviewer.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *